Cowboys & Cave men

peteevans

Pete Evans’ rise to fame was not so meteoric; he’s worked in television for most of my adult life, and I am pushing 40. Remember those awful Women’s Weekly cooking shows? Tedious. Tenuous. Terrible.

At the time I was studying to be a Naturopath and paving a unique path to wellness avoiding many of the ingredients he used. Like sugar, wheat flour and the like. He was so old school and uncool to me. Plus he had one of those faces that was not pretty and not ugly. Mediocre – like his cooking! 

Having been in the Naturopathy & Holistic Nutrition profession now for the same amount of time I have seen fads come and go. I have been asked my opinion on all things from the South Beach Diet, Mediterranean Diet, Vegetarian Diet, Raw Food Diet to Michelle Bridges, Jenny Craig, Light & Easy and the list goes on and on. I have seen people change their lives with food. From barely walking up the stairs to my clinic to competing in triathlons 12 months later. I have watched people become desperately defeated by food. I have seen them fail too. I have had the pleasure of witnessing people rise from the ashes of poor health and shine the light that was always inside them. A gift to say the least.

Many times I have felt that there is not any one particular diet that would befit everyone. A somewhat observational opinion after years of clinical work with people who enjoyed variable degrees of ‘healthy eating’. My job is to treat people less like text books and more like individuals – seeing each organ and function of the digestive system as unique to them and their body type. Some people are wired for carbohydrates, others could not care if they ate a legume for the rest of their lives. C’est la vie.

I have had my share of dietitian patients who have been put on unhelpful oh so 1984 styles of diet. You know, the low fat, high grain, lot’s of margarine and no butter kind of plan. This so called ‘scientific’ food profession is endorsed by the medicos- a bazillion dollar industry with limited interest in  holistic nutrition. And this is not about the magic of any particular food like Super Food Fads, it is about using solid healthy nutrition to provide an opportunity for the body to heal every day. Because that is what our body does: it repairs, regenerates and restores a bazillion cells every living day of our life. Nutrients are required for that ‘invisible’ process. Valuable nutrients like Essential Fatty Acids – chains which form the lipid bi-layer of every cell wall in your body; a wall which determines the entry of enzymes, minerals, vitamins, glucose etc and the exit of waste product that may act to damage the cell. Trans-fatty acids (TFA’s) such as those found in Margarine do not plump up and nourish the cell wall. In contrast they oxidise rapidly and contribute to a host of chronic diseases (choking our health systems) like Cardiovascular Disease.

Eventually, as my career has evolved I have found myself repeatedly encouraging people to adopt a Paleo style of diet. I am not hard-core but I believe in people moving away from our lazy, convenient style of pre-packaged eating. I urge people to celebrate and explore fresh living produce like their body’s depended on it – because it does! When people choose to eat meat, I ask them to consider their environmental footprint and make informed ethical decisions when buying their meaty cuts – a choice that is becoming increasingly easier due to popular demand.  If that is what being Paleo is, then blimey – tell me the problem? And if it is not the diet it leaves only one man standing……

So what is it about Pete Evans that really pisses people off?

I was slow to jump on the Pete Evan’s wagon. I reluctantly joined his Facebook Page – professional curiosity made me do it. I read his posts suspicious of his intentions, claims, and wondered who was writing on behalf of him. I was unsure about the fuss, hoo-haa, the celebritisation of it; but I also could not un-follow. I was surprised to see that Pete was actually saying things I professionally agreed with, the witch-doctor  in me suddenly had a bigger voice. I actually love it when he shakes shit up. He is a TV personality, a chef, and he is full of mad passion for well-being. He’s never looked better. I even went to his recent The Paleo Way tour in my home town and he is visibly glowing. I sat there expecting an arrogant twerp, but I found he was kinda like me when I am in the zone of convincing people that their lives can really change. I think that is what people mean when they say he is obsessive, but I found him to be energetic, informed and knowledgeable. He engaged every person in the audience – including me. I didn’t hang around for the book signing, I didn’t tattoo “Pete or Die”across the nape of my neck the following day, what I did was realise that I was developing a respect for him and his message. I respect that he calls on other professional experts in the industry to back his journey, I would be less forgiving if I thought it was just a Pete Evans jaunt. And perhaps that is why he receives so much criticism – because he is a chef and he seems to thrive on the media attention.

What I see from an educated perspective is a man encouraging people to step back from their children’s lunch boxes, their family dinner plates and pantry’s and ask themselves the same  question I have my patients ask everyday “What the F*ck am I doing”? He is encouraging parents to remove the sugary, starchy, chemical laden snacks marketed to us and replace them with REAL food. What an OUTRAGEOUS JERK. He is asking people to move away from the foods that have them on the unhealthy rat-wheel of carbohydrate and sugar addictions. LESS pizza, less fast food and  MORE cooking, more ethical informed choices. What a total F#CKWIT. Get my drift?

How do I feel about babies drinking Bone Broth instead of Formula? My professional opinion rests with the parent’s choice first and foremost. I would suggest that bone broth is a valuable alternative to highly processed Baby Formula, though I would not encourage the use of broth INSTEAD of formula in any baby under the age of 12 months. I do NOT agree with the use of toddler formula’s and I would like to call an end to the advertisements on TV that emotionally manipulate mothers to adopt Formula as part of a child’s full nutritional requirements. That pisses me off more than Pete Evans’ suggestion that bone broth is suitable nutrition for babies and toddlers. Just look at it with common sense, and not like you need lasso a wild bull. If you choose to make a bone broth for your baby/toddler 1. Make sure they are eating a variety of other nutritional foods 2. make sure they are receiving essential nutrients via the breast or your choice of formula 3. do not over-use salt in the broth 4. add the broth to vegetables, potatoes, fritters, or a sippy cup.

Some of the other reasons why I support Pete Evan’s Paleo Way is because he has single-handedly influenced mainstream nutrition on his journey; challenged the free ride many tired old Dietitians have enjoyed for too long; he has challenged the labelling of our food in the biggest supermarkets – such as the Heart Foundation and the big FUNDED tick of approval that is up for purchase to any company with deep enough pockets; he is using his fame to shine a light on the Naturopaths and Holistic Nutritionists who have had to slug it our for most of their careers without AMA and government support or recognition.

Sure, he is making a brand. I am a small fry, but everyone who wishes to be successful in business aims to do the same. Sure he is outlandish, but he believes in what he is doing – and like those of us who are buzzing with vitality, we want to share it.

Love him or hate him, he is laughing. And many of the people who are following him and changing their lives with real food are too.

Speaking of cowboys……

brad-pitt-thelma-and-louise

…just yes!

Melanie Robinson ND BHSc is a Naturopath and Real Food Enthusiast who believes that good nutrition is a portal to a better life. Float your own boat, but be wary of who and what you are defending before you start to lasso the people who are trying to push for change. She does run her own Nutrition Talks, even travels out of town to do so. She is speaker at this years IGNITE event presenting “Food as Medicine” in Sydney, Brisbane & Melbourne. Contributor to Nurture Magazine, Health & Heart blogger, Mother to 2 deliciously healthy boys, occasional potty mouth, writer of her own Bio’s….. (oh and Bazillion is not a word, just a friendly gesture of heaps and heaps)

46 responses

  1. I wasnt a fan of Pete when I first saw him on my kitchen rules but after the whole Paleo wave I respect him immensely.
    I grew up on broths. I have a baby 3 months old and im ready to go. My mum gave us broths in the 80s and alotfof Mediterranean families still do. Its not a ‘a new thing’ but Pete have definitely rejuvenated thr Paleo way.
    Hey my mum chased me around to eat my daily runny yolk, liver and brain when I was little. We ate the ‘whole’ animal.
    Oh and ive never had anything but a common cold in my 40years.
    Wake up people. This isnt a faf. This is REAL food.

    Marrow is your friend!

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  2. Hi Melanie, another question might be – “How do I feel about babies drinking bone broth instead of breastmilk?”. You didn’t mention breastmilk at all. Sometimes breastfeeding doesn’t go well for some people, and then either expressed breastmilk or donor milk are the next best options, followed by formula. It is very important that the message gets out there that support is crucial in the early days for families to help them get through the first few weeks of feeding, so that they hopefully don’t need to consider alternatives. That way there wont be a need to consider a more natural alternative to commercial infant formula.
    thanks,
    Naomi

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    • Oh gosh. Breast milk is always going to win. There simply is NO substitute to what nature gave us. As I said, after 12 months of age and IF the baby is thriving I would suggest that bone broth is quite acceptable when used in conjunction with a healthy diet. I see broth (and Vegetable juices) as extremely valuable to milk production in the early days – so if you are visiting a mumma with a new baby offer some broth or juice to her. I accept that some people resort to formula due to personal or medical reasons. I am not in the business of judging anyone for their choices. I hope that answers your question Naomi xx

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    • I couldnt bfeed for more than 3 weeks. Most heartbreaking as I wanted for a year. Goats milk formula was my next option and a probiotic. We do our best!!! Main food is the formula. I didn’t replace it. But a broth 30mins aftet a meal. Nit much. But a start.
      Gut health is key. Oh and breastfeeding is best when mothers nutrition is 100%

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      • Agree with that Anna. Breastfeeding is BEST when mumma is well nourished also. Such a valid point! Thank you. Goat’s formula + broth is excellent! My boys went straight onto fresh (raw – gasp!) Goat’s milk when they self weaned around 14-15 months. Both happy vibrant vege loving kids xx

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  3. Hi again Melanie,

    no worries, I was referring to when you said “How do I feel about babies drinking bone broth instead of formula?”. I was just a bit disappointed that you didn’t mention breastmilk. I agree with you on toddler formulas they are a way around a marketing loophole, and nothing else. I agree with the ‘no judging’ also – there is never any place for judging, just support, unconditional regard, and care.
    thanks for your reply 😉
    Naomi

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    • Yes. I guess I don’t think broth is the perfect replacement for breastmilk or formula in babies under 12 months. That is just my professional opinion. There is not any reason to avoid using it concurrently with either. I also agree that mothers need 100% support, love and kindness when embarking on the motherhood and breastfeeding journey. X

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  4. No one has mentioned the Vitamin A levels in the broth which pretty scay. He’s not a dietician or a doctor but when reccomending a diet to someone it takes very little time to estimate the vitamin/mineral content.

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    • Vitamin A can be toxic in high doses as retinal palmitate, which needs to be converted from beta-carotene. Beta carotene is a natural compound found in many food sources like carrot and in higher levels in organ meats like Liver where it is stored. One solution is to make broths from non-organ meats. Or avoid artificial sources like those found in some formula or careless children’s supplements. Broths are not the issue here – misinformation is.

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  5. Hi Mel, I appreciate your article, I have been watching him with interest, and have lately been making a lot of ‘paleo’ recipes. I do worry though, from an environmental perspective, he advocates a lot of meat eating and also heavy on some imported foods which isnt very sustainable. There was a great article in National Geographic recently, about how traditional foraging people really eat. Diets tend to be seasonal and local … And very flexible. Meat is not an everyday food. I really agree with what you say in regards to fresh foods etc, and on that point he is fantastic. I’m torn on how I feel about the paleo info day to day … I’m watching his facebook page too ….

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    • Hi Nicky, All I can add here is that at the tour I attended he continually advocated the use of products that could be sourced locally or within Australia at best. He also stated that if everyone turned Paleo today our farming practices could not support it – simply by the way we farm by comparison. All of the food and produce he used at the show was from local farms such as Near River Produce. He did mention that there was only one source of grass fed cartilage (a glucosamine supplement) available from America which he said he hoped would change and soon be made in Australia. I think being seasonal is Paleo by nature. I am not strictly Paleo as I have said, but I also think that a lot of his meals are very vegetable driven also. Meat is only a part of the whole picture…..and I professionally support the inclusion of lots more vegetable variety in people’s every day diets. X

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  6. Thankyou, well said. My Husbands family are from a tiny island in the pacific and if a mother can’t breast feed another nursing mother is used for breast feeds supplemented by a nourishing fish bone broth which has been used for thousands of years before any formulas were invented. Its not dangerous, just simple food as our ancestors made. I applaud Pete for standing tall in the face of all the criticism.

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  7. Just a small thing about the formula advertised everywhere for toddlers… you realise it’s because the companies are flat out not ALLOWED to advertise formula for under toddler age right? The only way to let those mothers who can’t breastfeed know about their products is to advertise for the toddler age group since there is now legislation in play banning the companies from advertising formula for newborns? On the bone broth thing, reading the ingredients, and the excerpt that I saw that pretty much said the recipe given was safe from birth I had a severe WTF moment. When pregnant, I was told very VERY firmly to NOT eat liver…. and then there’s a recipe to feed it to a newborn if you can’t breastfeed? That made me twitch. Lots. But then I have issues with the whole “paleo diet for babies” thing anyway. Since in the time period that the paleo diet is claimed to be from we did not live alone. If Mother A couldn’t produce milk anymore, there’s a damn good chance that there would be at least one other woman lactating that could pick up the slack until bubs could eat solids. THAT is what makes me wary, not the idea of eating whole foods instead of processed crap, the idea that a diet based on a period of time where we lived in community groups not individual families is going to work properly for those under the age of “kill my own food”

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    • Hi Dani, yeah I agree with you about the ability of women to once ‘share’ the task of breast feeding. I have not read nor seen Pete Evan’s new baby/toddler cookbook. I cannot vouch nor nit-pick it at this point. My point in the blog is that there seems to be a divide in whether people are against Paleo or against Pete Evans, or both? I am not implying that I am Paleo, only that the principles of good healthy eating are Paleo by nature (unless you are a vegetarian – which I was for more than a decade once). I don’t make the rules on formula advertising either – though it is ridiculous to think that at a time when a women needs the visual information it is disallowed – though it is not hard to find nor purchase. Which is great! The blog is not about breast Vs formula nor judging women who choose what is best for them or their circumstances. I also feel that it is too young to feed a newborn liver, and I personally would not do it. Thanks for your comment 🙂

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    • Hey Jim, I did not mean that a vegetarian diet is a fad diet. It is a brilliant diet, and I was vegetarian for well over decade in my life. Power to you. In many of my clinic programs I ask people to adopt a Vegetarian or Vegan diet to truly cleanse their body. My colleague is vegetarian. We LOVE vegetarians. Though not arrogant one’s – don’t like them much…….

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  8. Good read Melanie. I especially liked one of your closing paragraphs about “Naturopaths and Holistic Nutritionists who have had to slug it our for most of their careers without AMA and government support or recognition.”
    Things need to change, lest we fall into the decrepit HEALTH models followed in the UK and USA.

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  9. Great article love it thank you Melanie. I agree with Anna about eating the way most Mediterranean families still do and certainly like my parents have done throughout my life. They would use the whole animal, from top to toe. I am now in my 60’s and had gone astray from that style of eating until recently. Am now feeling much better although I am not entirely Paleo. I include Yoghurt, cheese and potatoes in my diet, I have cut out all grains and grain products, bread was the most difficult to give up but found myself feeling and sleeping much better for it.

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  10. As a student currently studying Dietetics, I find your references to my future profession as very insulting and misguided. Not all (if any dietitians I know) are like you claim – ‘oh so 1984’ that is certainly not true – dietitians want to help their patients be the best they can be through proper nutrition and education about healthy eating habits. These life skills that Dietitians teach can be used not as a one of fad but as a sustainable way of life. I don’t eat margarine and instead embrace butter as a whole food, as I like to eat as close to nature as possible – avocado, nuts and proper tuna in oil are some of my daily food choices, with more emphasis on good quality protein and fats than carbohydrates, but even carbohydrates have their place too – the wholegrain non processed kind. So I would like you to please refrain from such stereotyping about Dietitians who work very hard to make sure people live their lives to the fullest. Anna 🙂

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    • Thanks Anna, people and certainly students like yourself have a long road ahead. Your industry has incurred a bad rep through no fault of your own. I did not mean that ALL dietitians are bad, I merely referred to tired old Dietitians that need to make way for the younger and more holistic generation to come through – like yourself. One of my recent recipe shares on this blog was home-made Baked Beans so you will see that I am not a Paleo nazi. Perhaps within your profession you have similar opinions about Naturopaths, but those of Dietitians & Naturopaths who are passionate about our work and service to the community may well be on the same page!?

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      • Hi Melanie,

        Thank you for that – I completely agree that with the next generation no student I have come across follows the typical old food rules anymore – the Dietetics Association of Australia and the Health Department have stated that they are reviewing the recommendations of the past years to refresh them for a new updated version of the healthy food pyramid – one which does not have such a heavy emphasis on carbohydrates, though they are still an important part of a healthy diet, as you have so rightly demonstrated with your baked bean recipe! At the end of the day both Dietitians and naturopaths just want to see their patients living the best they can and looking after their bodies. And I myself see a naturopath along with a homeopath, so I am all for integrating traditional therapies into a healthy life! But please refrain from referring negatively to dietitians anymore, because that is not fair to students like me!
        Anna 🙂

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  11. I’m so disappointed by this Melanie. I know it’s already been initiated here, but it’s really destructive and destroying when professionals of other health modalities inaccurately criticise, judge and make false claims about practitioners from other modalities. It’s not a good way to make your point seem more valid and it makes me so terribly sad. I know you already clarified that you were referring to some old hat dietitians but that’s still a bad misrepresentation and not good enough. any practitioner from any health modality could make inaccurate, outdated advice (as they do) and additionally, the regulation and continual education requirements are much stricter for dietitians. As a student of both, naturopathy and dietetics I am extremely passionate in both areas and know a range of amazing practitioners from both modalities including my bf, an inspirational and incredible naturopathic student. I would like to tell you that the nutrition I have learnt in naturopathy was the same that I learnt in my first 2 years in dietetics. Same underlying anatomy, physiology and strong evidence based foundations; I’m not sure what you studied that you think it is so different. Where dietetics then extends with additional nutrition related studies for a couple of years, naturopathy extends with various disciplines as you obviously know and in my opinion both modalities have an amazing capacity in their own ways to make real positive differences in people’s lives. Articles like this that have been shared among my dietetic friends makes me need to stick up for Naturopathy over and over again and it breeds insensitivity; don’t get me wrong it happens SO much in naturopathy too. It just has to end.

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    • Really valid points Melissa, this blog is not scientific fact only my opinion and observation. I doubt very much that I, nor any blog will bridge the gap between all therapies. I agree with you whole heartedly that there are some ‘tired old Naturopaths’ around too. This, like your guidelines in Dietetics is gradually changing with higher education and training required for regulation. This I welcome – though know that my industry still suffers without medical recognition. I can only base my ‘opinion’ on my experiences with patients moving through my clinic. A perfect example of this was yesterday when a teenage girl saw me in clinic who had been to a dietician previously to ‘lose weight’ and the dietitian (rightfully) instructed her to reduce junk food and NOT to eat blah blah blah. I asked this girl about her circumstances, abandoned by 3 major family members, emotional eater, bullied at school, and so on. For me as a Naturopath her dietary work starts there – because no person emotionally crushed and defeated has the capacity to choose good food when they feel so bad about themselves. She never applied the Dietician’s instructions – she never went back. You can be scientific all you want but that doesn’t mean you are effective. Look, it also doesn’t mean she was a bad Dietician either…I just see this too often. Thanks a lot for your comment – I really appreciate it. Melanie 🙂

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      • This is making me physically exhausted Melanie, you’re still doing it. Why don’t you ask what is included and not included in the practice instead of assume? The sociology of why people do what they do and how we can assist to empower people to make realistic and enjoyable behaviour changes is a core aspect of being a dietitian in clinic. It is the grounding fundamental aspects of the decisions that are made and there are subjects upon subjects of ‘health sociology’ ‘behaviour’ and ‘counselling’. The most important things taught in this aspect in dietetics are to assist the client in finding options which suit them best and this includes; asking who cooks in the family, who they live with, what that’s like, ask about their timetable and things they do in life, ask them what they enjoy and what they don’t, ask them how they feel about their current health/relationships/activities and ask them if there are any limiting factors which prevent them from making changes including cooking skills and knowledge, emotional disturbances time etc. Like I said; any practitioner can make the mistakes and not evaluate this information (and in my opinion it would make them a poor naturopath/Dietitian/Nutritionist); and in fact I’v been to a BUNCH of naturopaths who I felt didn’t listen to me or my needs, concerns, life story or problems- that didn’t make me assume it wasn’t an aspect of their modality, it just made me realise those particular people were not very good of that aspect of what they did.

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      • Additionally, I can’t wait until naturopathy is more mainstream and recognised by the medical community- it’s by boyfriends life and it’s a huge aspect of mine- I can’t wait until I’m practicing; but this is NEVER going to happen until there are stricter requirements for continual learning for naturopaths and until naturopaths stop posting their anecdotal evidence as practice guidelines despite what current research states. The system available in the USA is incredible. I can’t imagine my bf, myself or my current naturopath ever doing anything like that- the decisions by some naturopaths are making others look unreputable by the medical community and the community at large.

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      • It’s really immature that my comment was not approved for moderation. This is what is fuelling hate towards both modalities; the fact that there isn’t an educated debate where the truth can be shared. I’m so hurt. If you want your own opinions, post it on your own personal Facebook page; not one that is promoting health from a qualified professional. You have a good nack of being able to make yourself look really good- it’s clear to your fans that you have the last word which makes you look right- and the reality is that I had a good point that hurts both naturopathy and dietetics and it was disaproved for moderation. People are of course going to believe you as well, they’re going on to a page where your qualifications are displayed and they aren’t expecting opinion, they’re expecting truth. I didn’t misinterpret you- you made out that dietitian don’t look at the social impacts of the individual and that you can foster these needs where a dietitian cannot; and it is fair to expect to read something from a health professional which has been backed up by fact by other professionals in this industry rather than opinion. Naturopaths are fighting so hard for their degree to be verified like it should by the public and by the medical professions as evidence based, and this isn’t helping. It’s fair to assume that unfortunately we won’t be recognised anytime soon and it’s fair for other health professionals (and naturopaths practicing as evidence based, how they were taught) to be really upset by this.

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      • Oh Melissa. It’s the weekend and my Kids really want some of my time. I accidentally binned your comment as I was using my iPad which is tempermental. Feel free to re-submit and I will approve it. (it is not to be found – I tried once I realised). Please don’t be hurt. You are obviously an intelligent passionate woman and most welcome on this thread. However please do not tell me what I can say or where I can say it. I am not GOD and I am not a messiah – nor is Pete, nor are you. I was using that example because it was fresh from that afternoon – though I have seen similar cases. I did not mean that ALL dietitians are incapable of assessing social impacts of individuals, only that this particular dietitian had not. As for backing up my ‘opinion and observation’ online shall I recall all the private messages of support from Scientific Research Managers, Dentists, Chiropractors, and various other professionals who congratulated me and agreed with me? It seems I have stepped on the toes of Dietiticans, and this was perhaps professionally or ethically wrong of me? But it is done, and I am sorry you are so upset. Know that I was not trying to target ALL dietiticans, particularly those who are doing a great job, that I am a pretty decent person, and that it’s the weekend, and my kids need some time with me.

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  12. The naturopathic community has fought for so many years now; primarily the last 2 to protect the modality from being cut in Australia and it’s been at the hard efforts of the naturopathic associations and naturopaths within it. Obviously they got rid of the diploma for upcoming students and have ensured that the bachelor degree is evidence based. You can’t pass the degree without ensuring that the information you acquire is from reputable, studied, evidence based sources and these boards are pleading people to believe that the degree is evidence based in the disciplines it looks at- just like dietetics does in their realm. I think the difference is that dietetics has very strict parameters by which practitioners can’t graduate and then have freedom of non-evidence speech- they have to ensure everything they say can be validated. Whereas naturopathy still doesn’t have these parameters and they can go off and practice differently to how they were taught- making recommendations or saying opinions without being accountable to be able to back it up. And this is where the problem lies- you can recommend people anything and be able to say your unevidenced opinions online for the consumer to follow; even though thats not what naturopathy stands for. It’s obvious why naturopathy is not being recognised in Australia and it’s valid that dietitians have a problem with this and then have their modality shamed incorrectly. Such as from your example of your client who couldn’t get help from the dietitian because her social needs weren’t being met and then explain how you, as a naturopath overcome these barriers. The truth is that dietitians have the same sociological groundings as you- your client just saw a bad dietitian. We can’t have the cake and eat it too. If we want naturopathy to be just as recognised we have to abide by what all other modalities do- and that is practicing and portraying ourselves in the public as how the degrees taught us, otherwise this bagging on naturopaths not being evidence based will never stop.

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    • Hi Melissa, again you make very good points. I am all for the changes in my industry and welcome them. I just hope others in the medical fraternity make some room for the great work some (not all) Naturopaths do. I really am not interested in being condemned for having an opinion online. I have received a great deal of personal and professional messages of support from MANY evidence-based professions (even a few medical). Yours is the one of a few negatives, which I am okay about and I have thanked you many times now for your contribution. If being regulated means being silenced then I am okay with retaining a sense of rebellion. Are you implying that I am the only person online with an opinion? Medical or Alternative? I have said a number of times now that I referred to ‘tired old Dietitians’ which you obviously are not; and also supported one commentator as being the positive new age of dietetics. I am now feeling exhausted Melissa…..

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